Applied Logic Engineering, Inc.

Technology Solutions for  your world

Panasonic GH1/GH2/GH3/GH4 Dual camera  Controller

Specifications:

* 4 inches by 4 inches by 1 inch tall

* Acrylic Top / Bottom panels protect circuit board

* Powered from camera’s DC adapter

* Includes DC power adapter cable and (2) remote cables

An embedded controller that allows simultaneous remote control of up to two Panasonic Lumix GH1/2/3/4 cameras  — great for 3D (stereoscopic) recording!

Use this controller with up to two cameras and control the camera functionality simultaneously from the push buttons on the controller board.

 

· Programmed to simultaneously control camera Power On, Power Off, Focus, and Shutter on two cameras

· Provides sync information between the cameras being controlled with on-board LCD

· Displays DC input power voltage level for monitoring battery input voltage

· Includes a time lapse function for unattended recording

 

 

 

The following information has been provided by David Cole of Next3D (www.next3D.com).  David helped during the development of this controller and has been instrumental in evaluation of the finished product:

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All DLSR sync to date is accomplished by powering up both cameras at exactly the same time to coordinate the sensor integration timers.  This method works particularly well on the GH series of cameras because they can be safely and reliably power-cycled from the external supply and there is little power filtering (e.g. big decoupling capacitors) internal to the cameras that might introduce non-deterministic power cycle times.   In most cases, initial sync is comparable to tri-level sync on a genlocked rig (and generally superior to LANC init).   My average initial sync on GH2 is .035ms,  as measured by Peter Wimmer's free Sync Tester software (http://www.3dtv.at/Knowhow/Synctest_en.aspx).  

 

Drift over time in the GH1 and 2 is generally 50 micro Sec/min - BUT - temperature variation of the cameras can affect drift dramatically (just as with LANC - sunk cams).   Applied Logic's controller monitors the VSYNC signal from the cameras video out to estimate sync.  This is equivalent (perhaps a bit more accurate as it's not a serialized, software process in the cam) to monitoring LANC packet timing on the LANC Shepard. In any case,  I highly recommend characterizing ANY non-genlocked with the Sync Tester software - and correlating the results to the VSYNC or LANC packet data.  This is critical to get a true picture of sensor integration sync on the cameras.

 

Also ** CRITICAL ** :   This sync "hack" will ONLY work with lenses that are NOT electrically connected to the camera body.  This is a universal truth in DSLR sync.  When electrically connected lenses (e.g. M4/3 lenses on a GH3) initialize, the time required is non-deterministic.  This will blow your sync out.   I use an adapter with Nikon lenses on my GH-based rigs.  Works GREAT.

 

As with LANC sunk rigs,  It's useful to try to purchase cameras from the same production lot.  I try to get consecutive serial numbers, or close.  This helps assure that the oscillators that control the sensor are matched.  This will minimize drift over time and allow for longer takes (30 min +)

 

David Cole <dc@next3d.com>

View sample 3D output taken with the GH3 camera setup here — http://vimeo.com/15666546